MMGM: Katerina’s Chickens Tell All

Katerina's WishYou might remember that I recommended Katerina’s Wish by Jeannie Mobley a little while back. Afterward, I was contacted by the book’s characters, asking if I would like to interview them.

Would I? Well, yeah!

I loved the characters in Katerina’s Wish. So I immediately started thinking of what I wanted to ask Katerina. Then I thought, wait—anybody can talk to the main character of a book. Why would I settle for an ordinary interview? I mean, I am a Feline Extraordinaire after all, so I should do an extraordinary interview!

carp

Photo: ALAMY

I thought and thought and came up with a purr-fectly ingenious idea. I’m an animal character, so I will interview the main animal character of Katerina’s Wish—the magic carp. Prepare to be amazed.

Hello, sir. Thanks for joining me today. You are a boy fish, right? I can’t tell. But you definitely look mouth-watering—I mean, magical!

Wait! Where are you going? Come back! I promise not to eat you!

Drat! He swam away. Now who can I interview? I know! I could talk to the chickens!

freefoto.com

freefoto.com

Good morning, ladies! Welcome to my little blog, Adventures in Imagination. Gather around, I have some questions for you.

First, I notice that snooty carp made it onto the cover illustration just because he’s supposed to be magic or something. You ladies did not, even though you have an important part in the story as well. How do you feel about that?

It is clearly wrong. I mean, what did that fish ever do to get on the front cover? Swim around and look at people with his beady fish-eye, that’s what. And then he does just what he did to you–swim away with his nose in the air. Or, um, water. We chickens on the other hand, make their breakfast, serve as town crier, earn them money, keep their insect population in check. Why, we even play matchmaker between Trina and Mark.  And what do we get to show for it? Tragedy, that’s what. Meanwhile that dumb cluck, Mr. Magic Carp gets to be cover boy?

What would you like to say to the Magic Carp about that?

Just one thing. Swim on, fish face.

And then you met a terribly tragic end. Was that really necessary, or is Ms. Mobley just prejudiced against chickens?

Jeannie Mobley

That Mobley lady is clearly prejudiced–just look at her! Throughout Katerina’s Wish you will notice a bias in favor of fish over chickens. Does the fish come to a bad end? No. Does the fish get thrown in a burlap sack, then a crate? No. And this whole idea that the fish grants a wish to make things get better? Excuse me, but those were OUR eggs they were eating for breakfast!

This bias has been around for a long time, apparently. When the family in the book tells those folk tales of theirs, the fish is all “Let me grant you wishes,” but what about the chickens? They get murdered violently by some cat with freaky switchblade claws.  Um, speaking of which, keep those paws in sight while we’re talking, would you Flash?

My claws are sheathed, ladies. Regardless of what that silly carp thought, I don’t eat my interview subjects.

Whew, that’s a relief!

Fortunately for us, all the neighborhood kids did bring us worms, grasshoppers, and stale bread to eat in the story.  So at least someone was looking out for us, even if it wasn’t the author. Still, we don’t think it would have been too much to ask to call the book Katerina’s Chickens.

In my humble opinion, Ms. Mobley wasted a purr-fectly good chance to give poultry a starring role in her book. If you could write your own story, what would it be about?

Ms. Mobley and her so-called author friends had a really funny time on Facebook and her blog, talking about a sequel involving Zombie Chickens.

Drawing courtesy of Greg Tanaka

Drawing courtesy of Greg Tanaka

Honestly! Zombie Chickens? That Mobley lady seems to think the only good chicken is a dead chicken.  But, as several readers and reviewers have noted, there is plenty of room at the end of Katerina’s Wish for a sequel, and since Katerina and her flock go to a farm, we think there is ample opportunity for Ms. Mobley to redeem herself on our behalf.

We envision a sequel in which the farmer’s success is threatened when a swarm of big, fat, juicy grasshoppers fly in to eat the crops. Katerina collapses in despair, with nowhere to turn for hope.  Then suddenly, over the horizon, WE arrive–a great and glorious flock–bantams, Rhode Island reds, chanticleers, buckeyes, Cornish whites. Grasshoppers everywhere flee in terror, but to no avail. They cannot escape the great Beak of Justice! In a flash (and a peck) the day, and the crops are saved!

My mouth is watering just thinking about it!

I prefer a nice mouse myself. But to each his own, I guess. Thank you so much for agreeing to speak with me today. I know the readers of Katerina’s Wish by Jeannie Mobley will be glad to hear the truth regarding the role of poultry in her book. And if they are anxious to buy their very own copy or would like to learn more about this book, they can check out the Simon and Schuster website here.

About flashthecatblog

I am the Professional Mews for Cindy Strandvold, as well as a huge fan of middle-grade books. Which, coincidentally, is the age Cindy writes for.
This entry was posted in Book Recommendation 2013, Flash Has Attitude, Interview, MMGM, Operation Story Share, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to MMGM: Katerina’s Chickens Tell All

  1. Thanks, Flash, for having me chickens by for this little chat. I will take their sequel suggestions under consideration. But I was also thinking that the folk tale about the rooster and the cat with the freaky switchblade claws could be fleshed out into a full novel, or maybe even a blockbuster movie. I was wondering if you’d like to audition for the main role, Flash? I think you’d be a natural!

    • Ooooh, I would be a natural, wouldn’t I? My claws are razor-sharp!
      And you’re welcome, I enjoyed visiting with your chickens. They were much more interesting than that uppity fish.

  2. idebenone says:

    This is a great book. Very well written and a wonderful glimpse into the time period!

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